Timing Technology

How Does GPS Network Time Synchronization Work?

Whether you're trying to get people to show up for a meeting or managing a scalable cloud-based business application, synchronicity is vital. Countless stakeholders and machines play essential roles in your processes. Keeping them all on the same timetable lets your organization move forward as a cohesive unit.

As far as networked hardware is concerned, you can't afford timing disparities. Here's how network time synchronization works and how to make your practices more effective.

Network Synchronization: Internet NTP Servers vs. GPS NTP Servers


Measuring time is about more than merely knowing when events occur. It's a vital prerequisite for synchronizing your operations, securing your data and serving your clientele. It pays to be precise, accurate and on-time, and your ability to do so depends on how good your time server is.

Unfortunately, you're unsure which kind of time server is best. You've narrowed it down to two choices: internet-based NTP and GPS-referenced Stratum 1 NTP. The distinctions aren't so clear, but these facts might make it easier to pick wisely.

GPS Over Fiber Optic Timing Technology

In the world of timing systems, precision and accuracy are everything. In order to synchronize components across great distances, it’s vital that you retain the ability to communicate cleanly. 

Most typical coax-based GPS timing networks you encounter in the real world fall prey to basic signal propagation challenges. Latency, degradation, and interference are among some of your worst enemies, and your existing systems may not be able to overcome them. Could optical fiber systems hold the key to building superior timing architectures?

Network Timekeeping: NTP vs. SNTP

In the world of modern computing, accurate timing is everything. As networks grow increasingly complicated, they demand reliable standards that ensure everything is running on the same unified schedule.NTP, or Network Time Protocol, is a standard method for synchronizing different computer clocks. Here's how it compares to SNTP, or Simple Network Time Protocol.