Network Time

Network Time Synchronization - Why You Need An NTP Server

A network time server is not something many business owners think of, and timekeeping is usually not a priority for network administrators. However, proper network time synchronization is an essential part of monitoring a network and resolving issues within it.

Numerous organizations have network devices that use an internal clock or make use of a Public Internet Time Server. The problem is that both of these timekeeping methods are less than optimal solutions. Most companies would be best served by implementing a Stratum 1 NTP  server to ensure that devices on the network are properly synchronized, maintain accurate time behind a firewall, and comply with timekeeping regulations.

Network Synchronization: Public NTP Servers vs. GPS NTP Servers


Measuring time is about more than merely knowing when events occur. It's a vital prerequisite for synchronizing your operations, securing your data and serving your clientele. It pays to be precise, accurate and on-time, and your ability to do so depends on how good your time server is.

Unfortunately, you're unsure which kind of time server is best. You've narrowed it down to two choices: internet-based NTP and GPS-referenced Stratum 1 NTP. The distinctions aren't so clear, but these facts might make it easier to pick wisely.

GPS Threat Mitigation - Why Network Time Users Should Care

Whether you use GPS to maintain accurate UTC for your facility's IP-enabled security system or you simply employ it to keep your distributed scientific control and testing systems synced up, you can't afford to succumb to an unexpected threat. From hackers and unwitting smart device users to regional atmospheric conditions and once-in-a-lifetime solar weather patterns, the world can be a risky place for those who depend on network GPS timing.

Network Timekeeping: NTP vs. SNTP

In the world of modern computing, accurate timing is everything. As networks grow increasingly complicated, they demand reliable standards that ensure everything is running on the same unified schedule.NTP, or Network Time Protocol, is a standard method for synchronizing different computer clocks. Here's how it compares to SNTP, or Simple Network Time Protocol.

2016 Leap Second

Since we started adding Leap Seconds in 1972, there have been 26 of them - with the 27th to follow at 11:59:59 p.m. UTC (6:59:59 p.m. ET) on Dec. 31, 2016. The most recent addition occurred on June 30, 2015, which was the first since 2012 and the second since 2008. None were added from 1999-2004, but one was added every year with only five exceptions from 1973-95.